Research to improve pest risk methods

The International Pest Risk Research Group is focused on improving pest risk modelling and mapping methods through the application and sharing of rigorous, innovative research.

Mark your calendars for IPRRG 2019 in Poznań, Poland!

Mark your calendars for IPRRG 2019 in Poznań, Poland!

The 13th Meeting of the International Pest Risk Research Group will be held 3-6 September 2019 in Poznań, Poland. The IPRRG is hosting the meeting in association with the Institute of Plant Protection, Poland, and the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO / OEPP).

We will be issuing a call for abstracts in the early part of 2019. Travel information and other details will be available soon on the "IPRRG 2019" meeting page.

Visit the "IPRRG 2019" page

IPRRG 2018 - PDFs of presentations are now available!

IPRRG 2018 - PDFs of presentations are now available!

Our 12th annual meeting was held 16-19 October 2018 in Taichung, Taiwan. The meeting was hosted in association with the Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute (TARI) and National Chung Hsing University (NCHU).

Participant presentations and other materials from the meeting are available from the link below. You may also visit the "Past Meetings" page.

Visit the "IPRRG 2018" archive

What is Project Stinky?

What is Project Stinky?

In 2015, IPRRG embarked on an ambitious new project: a global pest risk assessment for the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål). The effort, codenamed "Project Stinky", is intended to focus the skills and talents of the Group on a pressing issue and to demonstrate the Group's value to scientists, managers, and policy makers.

The project had its first output published in the Journal of Pest Science in May 2017.

To learn more, visit the "Project Stinky" page

Helicoverpa armigera invading the Americas

Helicoverpa armigera larva in maize (Photo Tek Tay, CSIRO)

Helicoverpa armigera larva in maize (Photo Tek Tay, CSIRO)

Helicoverpa armigera has recently been discovered in South America.  It has since been tracked spreading into the Caribbean.  Pest risk modelling has revealed that most of the US crop production may be at some degree of risk from this pest, which has developed resistance to most pesticides.  The rapid northward spread in the Americas suggests that it is now a matter of when, rather than if it will invade the USA.  The pest risk research has been published in PLOS One.

The potential distribution of Helicoverpa armigera

The current and potential distribution of Helicoverpa armigera

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Panama disease in Queensland bananas

  Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 has been detected in Queensland, Australia.  In a blow to lovers of Cavendish bananas, this devastating vascular soil borne disease of bananas has been discovered in Tully, North Queensland, Australia.  This news is particularly difficult for Queenslanders to accept, as they are affectionately known within Australia […]

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Myrtle Rust in Tasmania

Myrtle Rust, caused by Puccinia psidii s.l. has been detected in Tasmania, Australia.  Also known as Guava or Eucalypt rust, this pathogen has an extremely wide host range, focused on the Myrtaceae.  There have been a number of pest risk analyses prepared and published by our members.  One of these indicated that parts of Tasmania […]

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